Typically Untypical

This blog belongs to a silly 22-year-old Finnish girl. Reblogging anything and everything (plus a lot of Sherlock). Enjoy!

kanyedistressed:

i’m so glad that he exists

43 minutes ago on April 16th, 2014 | J | 6,944 notes

runningoncoals:

I am literally both of them at the same time

44 minutes ago on April 16th, 2014 | J | 360,955 notes

largecoin:

what a day!!!!!!!! nothing happened and i was tired

45 minutes ago on April 16th, 2014 | J | 550,405 notes

d0nn0:

Girl: u like horror games? 

Me: ye

image

48 minutes ago on April 16th, 2014 | J | 28,400 notes
48 minutes ago on April 16th, 2014 | J | 11,146 notes

meag-an:

thoselonelyeyes:

think about what your dog would say to you if he knew how much you hated yourself

this just changed my life

13 hours ago on April 16th, 2014 | J | 84,879 notes

scinerds:

sixpenceee:

As someone who wants to study the human consciousness I found this very interesting.

Scott Routley was a “vegetable”. A car accident seriously injured both sides of his brain, and for 12 years, he was completely unresponsive.

Unable to speak or track people with his eyes, it seemed that Routley was unaware of his surroundings, and doctors assumed he was lost in limbo. They were wrong.

In 2012, Professor Adrian Owen decided to run tests on comatose patients like Scott Routley. Curious if some “vegetables” were actually conscious, Owen put Routley in an fMRI and told him to imagine walking through his home. Suddenly, the brain scan showed activity. Routley not only heard Owen, he was responding.

Next, the two worked out a code. Owen asked a series of “yes or no” questions, and if the answer was “yes,” Routley thought about walking around his house. If the answer was “no,” Routley thought about playing tennis.

These different actions showed activity different parts of the brain. Owen started off with easy questions like, “Is the sky blue?” However, they changed medical science when Owen asked, “Are you in pain?” and Routley answered, “No.” It was the first time a comatose patient with serious brain damage had let doctors know about his condition.

While Scott Routley is still trapped in his body, he finally has a way to reach out to the people around him. This finding has huge implications.

SOURCE

How awesome is this! :-D!!

13 hours ago on April 16th, 2014 | J | 115,862 notes
nohighs:

YOU REALLY THINK A FUCKIN PANCAKE IS GONNA FIX THIS HEATHER

nohighs:

YOU REALLY THINK A FUCKIN PANCAKE IS GONNA FIX THIS HEATHER

13 hours ago on April 15th, 2014 | J | 59,000 notes
slackerlackermotivation:

needs to be put up in every school 

slackerlackermotivation:

needs to be put up in every school 

13 hours ago on April 15th, 2014 | J | 123,956 notes

mrcrockers:

mrcrockers:

hue jackman

image

i showed this to my sister and she slapped me

13 hours ago on April 15th, 2014 | J | 46,218 notes

harryedward:

“who could scroll past this” me

13 hours ago on April 15th, 2014 | J | 227,418 notes

heykarli:

My friends mom is 4’9 and her dad is 6’5. Whenever she is mad at him, she grabs a chair to yell in his face. Everytime that happens, he’s laughing too hard for her to stay mad. They say it’s the only way they’ve been married for so long.

13 hours ago on April 15th, 2014 | J | 167,030 notes
16 hours ago on April 15th, 2014 | J | 102,910 notes
icecooly94:

teacupnosaucer:

whoneedsfeminism:

I need feminism because “Who hired a stripper” shouldn’t be the first thing said to me when I walk into a welding job.

women in trades are treated like such fucking shit. 

NO I’M STILL STUCK ON THIS WHY WOULD ANYONE SAY THIS TO A WOMAN HOLDING A BLOWTORCH

icecooly94:

teacupnosaucer:

whoneedsfeminism:

I need feminism because “Who hired a stripper” shouldn’t be the first thing said to me when I walk into a welding job.

women in trades are treated like such fucking shit. 

NO I’M STILL STUCK ON THIS WHY WOULD ANYONE SAY THIS TO A WOMAN HOLDING A BLOWTORCH

17 hours ago on April 15th, 2014 | J | 90,575 notes
brainstatic:

John Green

brainstatic:

John Green

17 hours ago on April 15th, 2014 | J | 86,161 notes